side effects of the drug

According to the Washington Blade, Ken Mehlman is leading the effort to gather signatures for a friend-of-the-court brief signed exclusively by prominent Republicans.  The document addresses the issue of same-sex marriage, and urges the U.S. Supreme Court to find it a constitutional right when the court considers the  recent lawsuits from Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

These lawsuits all cover marriage rights for same-sex couples.  The court agreed to hear the cases in January, and is expected to deliver a ruling on the topics by the end of June.

According to sources familiar with the document, the legal arguments of the brief will be similar to the filing made before the U.S. Tenth Circuit Court of appeals, which argued that same-sex marriage promotes stability and mutual support.  It is also similar to an earlier brief that Ken Mehlman led in 2013 which argued against the constitutionality of California’s Proposition 8.  That brief garnered 131 signatures from within the Republican Party.

Some of those who have affirmed to the Washington Blade that they have signed the current amicus brief previously signed the 2013 brief, while other signatories are new.

Ken Mehlman was featured today in the New Yorker, as the organizer of a recent amicus brief to the Supreme Court regarding the Proposition 8 case.  This brief featured dozens of leading Republicans including Jon Huntsman, Meg Whitman, Ken Duberstein, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, and others, all stating that they supported a Constitutional right to same-sex marriage.

This landmark brief comes two days before the Obama Administration must decide if it is going to file a similar brief, and in one of the most high-profile Supreme Court cases of the year has drawn quite a bit of attention.  The New Yorker went on to explain just how important it was that Ken Mehlman was the one who helped to organize it.

“It’s not just that Ken Mehlman is a prominent Republican, which makes him an important asset to—and, now, organizer in—the gay-rights movement; it’s that he is one of the smartest political operatives anywhere in the country right now, and that he understands better than perhaps anyone how moderate and persuadable Republicans think. These are the very people the gay-rights movement is now trying to speak to. As Mehlman told the Times reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “We are trying to say to the Court that we are judicial and political conservatives, and it is consistent with our values and philosophy for you to overturn Proposition 8.”

Richard Socarides, author of the New Yorker piece, also discussed his personal experiences with Kenneth Mehlman.  The summer that he came out, he met with Mehlman and discussed what steps he would be taking.  Socarides remembers that “he told me that while he wanted to be an advocate and work for change and greater acceptance, he thought that he should first spend some time listening and learning.”

Socarides also detailed some of the work that Mehlman has done since that period of listening and learning, including being on the board of the American Foundation for Equal Rights, working with the New York based Freedom to Marry, and his advocacy in working for marriage equality in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, and Washington State.

Read the full piece, Ken Mehlman’s Gay Marriage Mission, at the New Yorker.